Intranet

HiPEAC-TFET

Dec-CS: The Computer Science Declining Phenomenon - Real Projects to Involve Undergraduate Students in CS

04/07/2011 10:00
04/27/2011 10:30
Europe/Paris
Location: 
Chamonix, France
Speaker(s): 
Marisa Gil

Abstract

Contrary to the continuing growth of the informatics industry in Europe the number of computer science experts (students, graduates, teachers, etc.) is declining.
This decline is producing some negative consequences in the technology field that affect other sectors like the economic and educational ones.
In order to analyze this situation and in view of providing solutions to stop the decline, it is primordial to understand the reasons that attract students to choose computer science as a domain of study and retain them in the field.

Bio: 

Marisa Gil, Associate Professor, has been at the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya since 1988. She received her Ph.D. in computer science from the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya in 1994 (Advisor: Nacho Navarro).
Prof. Gil is a member of HiPEAC, the European Network of Excellence on High-Performance Embedded Architecture and Compilation. She is also a Senior Member of the ACM and a Senior Member of the IEEE (IEEE Education , IEEE Computer Society and IEEE WIE). She has served on the board of Spanish IEEE Education. She is also co-founder of MuIN (Network Spanish Women in Informatics).

Marisa Gil's research is primarily concerned with the design and implementation of system software for parallel computing, to improve resource management. Her work focus mainly in the area of OS, middleware and runtime multicore architectures support. She is participating in the HiPEAC Network of Excellence and in the SARC European project.

Research topics are:

Operating systems for multicore heterogeneous systems, and parallel applications support on runtime.
Resource management at various component levels and for different execution environments to improve the performance at runtime.

Affiliation: 
Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya
Event Type: 
Lecture
Sponsor: 
HiPEAC

Teaching Introductory Computer Architecture and Programming: What, When, How? (Part 4)

01/24/2010 16:20
01/24/2010 17:30
Europe/Paris
Location: 
Palazzo dei Congressi "LUNGARNO BUOZZI - Facoltà di economia e commercio" , Pisa, Italy
Speaker(s): 
Avi Mendelson


·Summary and Synthesis (until 16:30)
·Discussion (from 16:30 to 17:30), with the active participation of the speakers and the audience.

Bio: 

Avi Mendelson is Adjunct Professor in the CS and EE Departments, Technion, and also works at the Microsoft R&D Center in Israel. Prior to joining Microsoft, he was with Intel for 10 years, where he served as a Senior Researcher and Principal Engineer in the Computer Architecture Group. While with Intel, he was the Chief Architect of the CMP (multi-core-on-chip) feature of the first two dual core processors that Intel developed, and is thus recognized as one of the key people to start the CMP revolution in Intel and later on in the entire industry. Now, at Microsoft, he continues his research in the relevant area and manages the Academic Relations of Microsoft Israel with Academia.

Affiliation: 
Intel
Event Type: 
Seminar

Teaching Introductory Computer Architecture and Programming: What, When, How? (Part 3)

01/24/2010 15:40
01/24/2010 16:20
Europe/Paris
Location: 
Palazzo dei Congressi "LUNGARNO BUOZZI - Facoltà di economia e commercio" , Pisa, Italy
Speaker(s): 
Sean Halle


The top-down approach to teaching introductory computer architecture and programming

Abstract

Bio: 

Sean Halle is a fearless entrepreneur from Silicon Valley. He founded a fabless chip company around a MIMD-SIMD low-power massively parallel processor for graphics in 1997 (ProSide), then switched over and worked his way up the software engineering foodchain, ending as Chief Software Architect at Nevik. Along the way, he has taught courses on Object Oriented Programming, as well as in-house seminars on emerging technologies at DEC, SRI, and Sun's JavaSoft. Currently he is finishing his PhD on Portable High Performance Parallelism, with a research focus on techniques for "write once, run high performance anywhere" parallel code.

Affiliation: 
INRIA
Event Type: 
Seminar

Teaching Introductory Computer Architecture and Programming: What, When, How? (Part 2)

01/24/2010 14:30
01/24/2010 15:10
Europe/Paris
Location: 
Palazzo dei Congressi "LUNGARNO BUOZZI - Facoltà di economia e commercio" , Pisa, Italy
Speaker(s): 
Yale Patt


The bottom-up approach to teaching introductory computer architecture and programming

Bio: 

Yale Patt is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and holds the Ernest Cockrell, Jr. Centennial Chair in Engineering, at The University of Texas at Austin. He received the year-2000 ACM Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award, "for great ability, dedication, and success in developing computer science education, and for outstanding achievements as a teacher". He is also the recipient of the: 1996 IEEE/ACM Eckert-Mauchly Award, "for important contributions to instruction level parallelism and super-scalar processor design"; 1995 IEEE Emanuel R. Piore Award (the IEEE Technical Field Medal for Information Processing), "for contributions to computer architecture leading to commmercially viable high performance microprocessors"; 1999 IEEE Wallace W. McDowell Award, "for his impact on the high performance microprocessor industry via a combination of important contributions to both engineering and education"; and 2005 IEEE Charles Babbage Award, "for fundamental contributions to high performance processor design". Yale Patt has authored, with Sanjay Patel, the textbook Introduction to Computing Systems: From Bits and Gates to C and Beyond, which is intended as an introduction to computing for serious students of computer science, computer engineering, and electrical engineering.

Affiliation: 
University of Texas
Event Type: 
Seminar

Teaching Introductory Computer Architecture and Programming: What, When, How? (Part 1)

01/24/2010 14:00
01/24/2010 14:30
Europe/Paris
Location: 
Palazzo dei Congressi "LUNGARNO BUOZZI - Facoltà di economia e commercio" , Pisa, Italy
Speaker(s): 
Yale Patt


The art of high-quality teaching, especially as applied to introductory computer architecture and programming

Abstract

Bio: 

Yale Patt is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and holds the Ernest Cockrell, Jr. Centennial Chair in Engineering, at The University of Texas at Austin. He received the year-2000 ACM Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award, "for great ability, dedication, and success in developing computer science education, and for outstanding achievements as a teacher". He is also the recipient of the: 1996 IEEE/ACM Eckert-Mauchly Award, "for important contributions to instruction level parallelism and super-scalar processor design"; 1995 IEEE Emanuel R. Piore Award (the IEEE Technical Field Medal for Information Processing), "for contributions to computer architecture leading to commmercially viable high performance microprocessors"; 1999 IEEE Wallace W. McDowell Award, "for his impact on the high performance microprocessor industry via a combination of important contributions to both engineering and education"; and 2005 IEEE Charles Babbage Award, "for fundamental contributions to high performance processor design". Yale Patt has authored, with Sanjay Patel, the textbook Introduction to Computing Systems: From Bits and Gates to C and Beyond, which is intended as an introduction to computing for serious students of computer science, computer engineering, and electrical engineering.

Affiliation: 
University of Texas
Event Type: 
Seminar
Syndicate content